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Headlines for Refixia


New medicine Refixia▼ for the treatment of haemophilia B

Refixia▼, from Novo Nordisk Ltd

About medicine

Novo Nordisk have launched their haemophilia B treatment nonacog beta pegol, brand name Refixia, in the UK.

Refixia is a medicine used to treat and prevent bleeding in patients with haemophilia B, an inherited bleeding disorder caused by lack of a clotting protein called factor IX. It can be used in adults and children from 12 years of age.

Refixia contains the active substance nonacog beta pegol.

New medicines and vaccines that are under additional monitoring have an inverted black triangle symbol (▼) displayed in their package leaflet and summary of product characteristics, together with a short sentence explaining what the triangle means – it does not mean the medicine is unsafe. You should report all suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) for these products. ADRs can be reported by your doctor, pharmacist or online via the Yellow Card system. See full article for link.

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Reporting of suspected adverse reactions

Reporting suspected adverse reactions (side effects) after authorisation of the medicinal product is important. It allows continued monitoring of the benefit/risk balance of the medicinal product. Healthcare professionals or patients are asked to report any suspected adverse reactions via the Yellow Card Scheme at yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk or search for MHRA Yellow Card in the Google Play or Apple App Store.


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